The Subway Tiles You need for your next Mosaic

The Subway Tiles You need for your next Mosaic

Ask the manufacturers, designers, or end-time users if you want to learn what people feel about subway tiles. Each of them will download these excellent interior décor materials to obtain the best of your dreams. In terms of application, it can work for various parts of the home interior, including the kitchen, bathroom, mudrooms, and other places.  Click here to buy subway tiles online.

A Brief origin of Subway tiles

In summary, the subway tiles were first used in the New York City subway transportation system in 1904. However, it may be hard to believe that the subway gave the unique tiles its name. Moreover, it has been in existence for over a century, yet it has not lost its glamour nor beauty over the years. Some of these early designers choose to cover the walls and floor of the subway with these subway tiles because they are straightforward to install and clean. In the end, they want it to be that the subway tiles create imagery in the mind of the subway users in a problematic way to forget. 

The Infamous New York City Mosaic

The subway tiles have further recreated the New York Subway by adding a very astonishing design called the Big Apple. The Big Apple shows the richness of the rail station in terms of art. In addition, people traveling through the rail station can also enjoy the pleasure of the artwork while seeing many public works going on in the subway station. In addition, you may even find some websites and tours where you can further have a feel of the subway station. 

The once-ridden walls with subway tiles are now transformed into a ubiquitous NYC subway mosaic art. This blend of the subway tiles into a modern artistic skyscraper is a good perception of things that journey from good to better—similarly, some other mosaic wall art subway tiles, some of which are listed below. 

The Subway Tiles You need for your next Mosaic

The Signs of Life by Jackie Chang (2000)

Down at the underground station at the Metropolitan Avenue/Grand Street on the IND Crosstown Line is this beauty of mosaic art. When this art was first created over two decades ago, hardly anyone could believe that it was made on the same subway tiles, you know. Of course, it has a peculiar finish that further brightens the color and texture as Mosaic. 

Glass Mosaic Wall art by Robert Kushner

The Glass Mosaic Wall art by Robert Kushner is a beautiful piece of art located on the 77th street of the IRT East Side Line. When you take a closer look at this mosaic wall art, you will notice how the artist blended a geometric shape of the smaller glass tessera with the other tiles in the final output. Moreover, this mosaic piece is evidence of expanding people’s perception about subway tiles to that which has become more widely accepted. 

For Want of Nail by the MTA Arts

On behalf of the Transit Design Team, MTA Arts created a mosaic mural called “For Want of a Nail.” This fantastic work of art shows a variety of how to combine subway tiles to make mosaic designs to depict a great form of animal life. This mosaic art is located at the 81st street station for the Museum of Natural history. This work aims to bring the natural world into the subway station with the effect of artificial lights. Meanwhile, the design theme shows different forms of animal life, ranging from extinct ones like dinosaurs to aquatic animals such as sharks and whales. Therefore, the visitors can also spot everything available as they pass the station. 

Artemis, Acrobats, Divas, and Dancers by Nancy Spero 

The Artemis, Acrobats, Divas, and Dancers by Nancy Spero were created in 2004 with such intensity of religion icon through its installation. The theme of the Mosaic was the ancient Greek gods and the associated myths. The location of this beautiful art is the 66th Street/Lincoln Center and Riders on the IRT West Side Line that may otherwise feel clumsy. This Mosaic is nothing short of an exquisite look with lots of brightly colored subway tiles to portray the glory of Rome. 

The Subway Tiles You need for your next Mosaic

As Above, So Below by Ellen Driscoll

Ellen …